Therapeutic Confinement

Therapeutic confinement

Often times, pets injure themselves or they have to undergo surgery and they’re put on strict rest by their veterinarian. Just like humans, it is essential for pets to rest so as to not be set back by further injury or delay of healing. If it is a post surgical site, excess movement could potentially lead to fluid build up, inflammation, opening of the incision site, or infection. This means only 5 minute potty walks and straight inside. No running, jumping, or walking up stairs. We at Animal Internal Medicine and Specialty Services have some suggestions as to how to help you confine your pet when these situations come up.

What we recommend:

For our kitties, a dog crate that has enough room for a potty box and a bed will suffice. Larger pets can have their own isolated room where they cannot jump up onto furniture and accidentally injure themselves. An X-pen and large crate will work as well.

Don’t forget, that you need to train and prep for your pet to cooperate in a crate/isolation quarters on their own. Always associate this space as their safe space and good things come to them when they settle in the area nicely. Start small, treat or provide a favorite toy with the isolation quarters/crate door open and for a short amount of time. Allow your pet to move in and out at their own leisure. Keep an eye on your pet if your pet is already at an injured state, so as to not injure his or herself more. Slowly increase the time they’re in the isolated place and treat accordingly. A great distraction is to give your pet a toy that you could hide food and treats in it. This is not the spot for time outs as your pet will associate the space as a negative place to be and it will cause anxiety and stress when left alone.

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Happy New Year! Resolutions for Pet Wellness in the Coming Months

Closing out the year and starting a new chapter can feel so inspiring. To be sure, there’s never a better time to tap into your motivation for change than when on the brink of of a new year. Your biggest and most constant supporter is, of course, your pet who will be along for the ride in 2018. A great way to reward them for their friendship? Resolutions for pet wellness in the new year!

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When Good Pancreases Go Bad: Pancreatitis in Pets

pancreatitis in petsAs far as internal organs go, the pancreas is a pretty formidable foe. Sure, when it’s happy everything seems to be sunshine and rainbows… But make the pancreas mad, and the fun is over.

Pancreatitis in pets is a common, but not so welcome, diagnosis here at Animal Internal Medicine and Specialty Services. This condition can require extensive care and is one all pet owners should know by name.

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Scaredy Cat? What You Can do About Feline Anxiety

feline anxietyDoes your kitty hide beneath the bed when company comes over? What happens when you prepare for a trip? Do they lay inside your suitcase as you pack? Does your cat react in kind when you’re tired, grumpy, stressed out, or upset?

All cats are different, but feline anxiety is a common experience. Sure, you can chalk it up to Fluffy’s personality or mood, but left entirely alone, your cat’s anxiety could turn into a full-fledged behavioral concern.

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