Therapeutic Confinement

Therapeutic confinement

Often times, pets injure themselves or they have to undergo surgery and they’re put on strict rest by their veterinarian. Just like humans, it is essential for pets to rest so as to not be set back by further injury or delay of healing. If it is a post surgical site, excess movement could potentially lead to fluid build up, inflammation, opening of the incision site, or infection. This means only 5 minute potty walks and straight inside. No running, jumping, or walking up stairs. We at Animal Internal Medicine and Specialty Services have some suggestions as to how to help you confine your pet when these situations come up.

What we recommend:

For our kitties, a dog crate that has enough room for a potty box and a bed will suffice. Larger pets can have their own isolated room where they cannot jump up onto furniture and accidentally injure themselves. An X-pen and large crate will work as well.

Don’t forget, that you need to train and prep for your pet to cooperate in a crate/isolation quarters on their own. Always associate this space as their safe space and good things come to them when they settle in the area nicely. Start small, treat or provide a favorite toy with the isolation quarters/crate door open and for a short amount of time. Allow your pet to move in and out at their own leisure. Keep an eye on your pet if your pet is already at an injured state, so as to not injure his or herself more. Slowly increase the time they’re in the isolated place and treat accordingly. A great distraction is to give your pet a toy that you could hide food and treats in it. This is not the spot for time outs as your pet will associate the space as a negative place to be and it will cause anxiety and stress when left alone.

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